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  • Anna

    While I get some of this, if you follow certain politician then aren’t people going to work out your politics anyway and what one person considers extreme?

    Don’t most people use social media to share holiday photo’s and updates – therefore people are going to know when you’re away.

    Good in theory, but not sure how it all works in practice.

    Agree with the photo’s tho and sickie :-)

    • http://davidwees.com/discuss David

      You don’t have to update Facebook with the photos while you are away though, you can wait until you come home…

    • http://mymindfield.wordpress.com smurfgalak

      Not necessarily :)

      I’ve seen – on Twitter especially – people following politicians, columnists and bloggers from opposing sides, so to speak. They just want to keep updated, not necessarily a show of support.

  • Ritesh Patel

    I think the biggest thing people forget about social media is use “common sense”. The barriers of shame and embarrassment seem to be breaking down online. Common sense in the real world says, “lock your door”, “don’t give a stranger your phone number or address” and “keep your identity safe”. But most forget this online.

    The penchant for sharing photos online is no different to when we used to keep pictures of our kids in our wallet and share them with people at the first chance to show them off. Online is so much easier.

    Overall a good list thanks for sharing Jeff.

    • http://www.skippingstones1.wordpress.com Gem

      I agree. Also, people are happy to share so much information online, but when you try and get to know someone in person they box up.

    • http://www.probablyrachel.wordpress.com Rachel

      I completely agree!

      Most girls won’t give out their phone numbers to a kind of creepy guy at a party, but would add him on Facebook. So now he not only has a phone number he can see all of the bikini photos from the beach.

      Common sense seems to die online.

  • http://jeffbullas.com mdspatsy

    Dear friend,
    Well and wish to hear the same from you.
    All your saying on do and do not on any social website and stressed the importance of vital informations regarding family,dating, about companies policies and company!s executives plan of actions, some vital photos of our family,health and wealth conditions are remarkable and you have cleared all general doubts,the roles of these social websites on our day today life.
    many thanks,

  • http://radiopotato.com Allison Rizk

    These are too funny.

    I have to admit, the FB’ers that regularly post drama with their friends, while ridiculously obvious you should NOT post those things, my friends and I tend to find their posts hilariously funny and will keep them as friends for entertainment purposes. In fact, there’s an article in GQ called “Eighteen People You’re Scared Of On Facebook” that is so dead-on and will leave your belly howling with laughter. I could identify each one with an identity. Here it is: http://www.gq.com/entertainment/humor/201001/scary-facebook-friends-profiles#slide=1

    Thanks for posting!
    Allison

  • http://brains-trust.co.uk Alex Parr

    Great points but I’m not sure whether I agree with you totally about the linking aspect of personal sites and professional ones like LinkedIn. People buy from people and therefore, particularly on Twitter, it is important that everyone knows what you are like personally but I would say that you should be professional about it and until you know who you are dealing with, don’t reveal anything too personal. In other words, use common sense and act online like you would do offline.

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  • Marc

    I absolutely agree with reason #29

  • http://www.liquidwholefood.com Carolyn from LiquidWholeFood.com

    Call me old fashioned, but I really can’t fathom the need to post obscene and vulgar content. I guess if you’re not building a personal brand it might not matter, but I will tell you that someone lost my business by posting an especially crude status.

  • AmyZ

    As a college student, I have to wholeheartedly agree on all of these. I’ve seen people get denied jobs and internships based on things they’ve posted on social media sites. Sorry ladies, but no one thinks pictures of you on spring break on the toilet is cute. Especially not your potential boss.
    I’d agree with LinkedIn comment Alex Parr made. It’s a grey area. I’d be fine with posting it on my Facebook and Twitter, because I have made sure they are respectable and clean!

  • http://www.perkettprsuasion.com Christine Perkett

    Common sense, although I do break #16 on Facebook.

    I agree with Ritesh re: “barriers of shame and embarrassment seem to be breaking down online.” It’s a bit scary – I’ve learned more about people than I’ve wanted to these last few years.

    Also – count this in the “hard to believe but true” files (not me, let’s be clear): Don’t set up a false Twitter handle, use the public stream to Tweet (inappropriate content) to the other party from #6… and have that Twitter handle tied to your real Gmail account…. that you use at work. (Remember, Twitter allows people to search for friends who they’ve emailed or chatted with in Gmail). Awkward, to say the least.

    Christine
    @missusP

  • Thought I was safemom

    I like to keep albums of my family on facebook for friends and family and I have heard that facebook will make email obsolete because of the ability to goto someone’s site and not have to share large files through email. If you have to allow people acces into your account aren’t your pictures safe?…I understand you are talking about a new policy with facebook, so I naturally want your input on this especially since I am going through a separation, but even more so if I am making my children a target in some way I do not want to do that!

    Thanks,

    • http://www.facebook.com/samantha.dehart Sammi

      Sorry to say but even then they are STILL NOT SAFE! Just post the pictures you need to is what I do, NOT EVER SECOND of your child’s life & you should be okay! (My children photos that I put up are all a couple years old, I do that so someone cant recognize them IF they were targeted!)

      • http://www.facebook.com/samantha.dehart Sammi

        every* UGH I am tired, typos, blahh! (Sowwy)

  • http://barrydewar.wordpress.com Barry Dewar

    Facebook is very different from Twitter. They may be trying to open it out in the same way but they’re hamstrung in just how far they can take it by the privacy issues involved. They’ll never be able to open out completely.

    As it stands, if you set your privacy right then you can behave quite differently on Facebook than you can on Twitter. Only friend up your real friends and family, make your account private and feel free to post pictures of your wee ones or comprimising stories of what went on in Vegas.

    In other Social Media spaces though, all of the above apply in general but personal brands are, by definition, quirky. It may serve you well to post about your personal views on religion or politics if you’re happy with your niche. As with the Real World, everyone is different and that should be celebrated, not blanded out by adhering to a set of rules.

  • http://www.unhappyfranchisee.com Unhappy Franchisee

    I recently ran across a Facebook group in which sub shop employees traded stories about how much they hate their customers. It was quite vicious, crude & laden with profanity. I posted excerpts here:

    Facebook Horror Stories: Sub Franchise Employees Hating On Customers
    http://www.unhappyfranchisee.com/facebook-horror-stories-sub-franchise-employees-hating-on-customers/

    While it’s obviously damaging to the sub chain’s brand, these employees don’t realize the damage they are doing to their own reputations and any hope they may have of decent employment. It’s like putting up a billboard with your picture that reads “Don’t hire me! I’m a moron!”

  • http://www.moscreative.com/ Stephanie Wheeler

    I can definitely see where you are coming from with this post. Some people post a ridiculous amount of information on their personal profiles. I believe in having a standard of… if there’s someone in the world who you don’t want to see the content, including your mother, your significant other, your friends, your employer, a burglar, etc., DON’T post it online. Once it is online, consider it global for all eyes to see. With proper privacy settings, you may be safe from some, but if they want the information bad enough, they will find a way to get it. So bottom line…Don’t post personal information that isn’t appropriate for everyone in the Internet audience.

    MOS Website: http://www.moscreative.com/
    MOS Blog: http://blog.moscreative.com/

  • http://me1first.blogspot.com Edie Galley

    Even though these don’ts seem obvious you still see this type of stuff posted again and again. Thanks for helping others that are not thinking about helping themselves.

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  • http://www.notjustagranny.wordpress.com Cindy (notjustagranny)

    Hi Jeff,
    thanks for a really interesting and thought-provoking article. Of course I read this straight after reading your post on 20 Things you should share on Social Media.
    I have to absolutely agree with:
    #1 farmville….it’s totally annoying.
    #16 unless you know how to set your privacy settings, this is a no, no.
    as for all the rest, you kinda opened my eyes a bit, I never realised that people post some of those things; unreal.
    I read through the comments and I agree with a number of the points made, and I guess it depends on why you are using these platforms. Loads of people fall into the personal use category and therefore will post what they like not considering the consequences. My nephew lost his job due to his posts, and I unfriended him on facebook coz of his content. In fact, I make that a rule on both facebook and twitter. If someone befriends or follows me and I find their content undesireable, I simply block them. I don’t mind marketing, or promotional messages, as I too am in business, however, if someone blasts me with only marketing links whatever the content, I block them too.
    If we are using these platforms for business or branding then it makes sense to keep it clean.
    I note what both Retish and Christine say about barriers breaking down, and people who are inclined to that type of behaviour online are probably that way inclined offline.
    Your tips are great and there are a geat many people who could benefit from reading your blog. Thanks again for terrific content.
    Hopefully I havn’t broken any rules :)
    Cindy @notjustagranny

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  • http://www.HeidiTown.com Heidi

    4.That you are having a party.. you might get more guests than you counted on.

    Or there will be hurt feelings. For instance, if you are throwing a party and haven’t invited all your FB friends, but they all find out that you are throwing a party because you stupidly announced it on FB and now they know they weren’t invited… it’s bad, real bad.

    I don’t obey all these rules, but I do try to keep my professional sites separate from FB. Don’t need my LinkedIn pals to see drunk party pics that my wonderful FB friend decided to pull out from 10 years ago and tag me (okay, it was really from last weekend). Ha. :-)

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  • http://www.kunstundso.com stefan

    Great Post. I am guilty of a few things but i’m luck because my boss didn’t find out. Yet. :)

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  • http://bethebutterfly.wordpress.com Perri Blake Gorman @bethebutterfly

    While I agree with most of these, I think some depend on the user and their level of comfort. For instance, I personally mix business and personal to the point where I have a teeny-tiny personal box (includes all bodily functions & family drama!) that is off-limits and everything else is me, which is essentially how I have branded myself.

    I am actually traveling now and have been meeting people from Twitter and Foursquare. I have broadcast my travel schedule all over the shop so people know where I am so that I can have the greatest chance of meeting people. I can understand that people may want to protect their homes, and that is sensible, but if someone wants to break in there are many ways.

    The one I am also on the fence about is the video and photos of children. I am not a mom yet, but being that I live my life online now, I wonder how I will feel about this issue when I have kids. Sometimes I look at the “mommy bloggers” and think, “OMG! How can you broadcast your kid like that on YouTube!” but my friend in Melbourne just had a baby and her husband won’t let her put photos of the baby on Facebook. Bummer. What is line?

    Thanks Jeff :) I always love your posts!

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  • Kim

    Jeff,
    You pitched in “images of your children” at #16 almost as an aside. Will you please elaborate? Do you mean that in a professional context> Or both professional and personal? I manage the social media strategy for a $25 B organization and keep my professional uses of social media competely segregated from my personal channels/profiles. As a “mommy blogger” I don’t share our last names or location.

    I’d love to know your thoughts on managing privacy and professional image — such a growing issue!

    • Wolftracker

      I rather think that Jeff refers to posting pics of our kids as a means for predators to “perv” your kids photos, and hope to gain further access to them by posing as someone you as a mother might inadverdantly trust with deeper personal info about your kids, your family, things you do together i.e Mr child molester poses as a soccer mom, chats you up for 6 months to where you think “she” has turned into a great and trustable friend on FB. Your kid has soccer practice at 2:30 PM … and needs to be picked up at 4:00 PM. Mr child molester makes a practice out of hangin out nearby observing your kid, waiting for just the right moment to approach, or even take your child, even moments before you arrive.

      I know this “seems” very unlikely – what are the odds this child perv is even remotely within your area of the world? Answer: VERY – Pervs will go to ANY extreme to get at kids they feel are vulnerable, even traveling cross country to where the kid’s familes live. And they do this ALL the time. And info that helps them is posted EVERY hour by well-intentioned parents merely wanting to share the joys of being a proud and loving parent. KEEP kids photos OFF the Networks! When Aunt Sally comes over for noon tea, THATS when it is appropriate to show off the kidlets.

      As for being professional in posts to maintain proper decorum and professionalism, generally I go by the concept that if I am not comfortable, or a co-worker is not comfortable, with discussing a thing in the workplace, then I should probably refrain from posting it to a blog or other form of social networking site.

  • http://www.ryanhukill.com Ryan Hukill

    I too would really like some clarification on the topic of posting pics & videos of children. I’ve never quite understood why some people are so freaked out about this, and what it is they think will happen if they post such things.

  • http://walteradamson.com Walter Adamson

    I follow the general idea but I don’t stress – meaning I don’t think about every move – about posting family photos, and certainly mixing business and personal on FB is a non-issue for me. I just don’t get the point in segregation anymore.

    I used to do it that way but let’s face someone just googles and there it all is in a big list, all my personal and business footprints. Do you mean don’t place personal photos on Flickr or Picasa etc etc as well, as they’ll be found in an easy few steps?

    Sure, you need to think one step ahead before doing something you’ll regret.

    So for me that means just that – think just a moment, without getting tied up in knots about segregating what goes where and who might see it. It will all be found! And in fact people like to know something about a persons personal context even if they only have business relationships.

    I think this is all just one big melting pot. I can see Facebook far outpacing Linkedin for business, even though there are those who swear they will only use Linkedin for business. What they “swear” is actually irrelevant, since you need to be where business is being done if you want to do business, and if that’s FB then that’s FB, no matter what you feel about that. I have no idea if I’m right or wrong but my perception of the trend for business is Linkedin down, FB up.

    I go with the flow of how the world’s going even if I don’t have all the answers or know where it will end up. Sure, there’s a risk, but there’s a risk in giving your kids a flu vaccination and I’d rather sweat that one than sweating the semantics of an intended comment re personal or business and where I post it.

    Anyway yours is a thought-provoking post, as always.

    Walter Adamson @g2m
    http://xeesm.com/walter
    Melbourne.

    • http://www.mintzwebdesign.com Margie Mintz

      The whole question of personal and professional, and where they intersect is an interesting, and ever-blurring one.
      It is blurring, and the easy answer is to think before you post, be the same person with the same sense of ethics and principals whether you’re tweeting, or taking a friend to lunch.

      Loved the post, and good comments.
      Margie

  • Obviously Anonymous

    Damn… and I was just about to connect a motion detector from my pants to facebook…

    Thanks for the heads up!

  • bidaelgran

    Agree with point 1, so annoying. :D

  • http://www.seo-ahmedabad.com sarjit soni

    Awesome post.. Agree with all point. Thanks

  • http://marianlibrarian.com Marian Schembari

    This is a great list, and I agree with most of it. HOWEVER. I disagree with…

    #19/29: I keep Facebook 100% personal but I connect Twitter and LinkedIn, even though Twitter is 50/50 personal and business. I think it’s important to inject a good amount of “personal” info into your business. People whine that they don’t want to know what someone had for breakfast, but isn’t that what small talk is? The whole point of networking is that you connect with people on levels that may or may not be directly connected to your job. And that’s fine! Networking would be soooo boring without that!

    #22: Agree that it sounds like a scam, disagree that it can’t be helpful. Doing it in a creative way (ala Naomi Dunford: http://bit.ly/9m2hEy or, well, me: http://bit.ly/dxqzmI) can be both popular and helpful. Just depends on how you do it. Using autofollow programs and spam is NOT the way to do it. Advising people what works and what doesn’t (like maybe this post?) IS useful.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/harperone.molly Molly

    When I first started blogging in 2002 social media existed almost soley for the purpose of anonymously sharing the details of your life with kindred strangers that you would eventually build friendships with. It has changed completely but I continue to use it as I always did by keeping my personal sites private (no sharing of my real name, location or details) but also getting the most from new social media which is extension of the relationships I have in Real Life.

    I guess my point is: do a good job of hiding your personal blog.
    And also that: I’m nostalgic for the old days when the web was a bunch of awkward 20-somethings. =)

    • http://twitter.com/CECSarahG Sarah Glenn

      Hey, I WAS an awkward 20-something on the web in the old days… now, I’m in my 40s. Where does the time go? :)

  • http://www.twitter.com/TerranceCharles Terrance Charles

    I especially hate #1 and #2 OMG, it’s like really, do you think I care? I get this all the time in my stream…

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  • http://fatheffalump.wordpress.com sleepydumpling

    Meh, if I followed these rules, my Facebook and Twitter would be empty.

    Use your brains people, not rules and lists.

    • http://onlinemediasupport.com Marcelle Paisley

      Hi Jeff and all.

      I agree don’t link Facebook with Linkedin.

      I also agree that some personality in business is better. If they know you better you either part ways or do better business quicker.

      However, I really don’t like annoying people with my chooks, so everyone is in a LIST. Yes, every post I make takes a little longer, but every fb communication is DIRECTED to the audience it is meant to be.

      c’mon we need to grow up, and use the skills we have and tools that there are to manage multiple relationships on all kinds of levels simultaneously.

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  • Trish Smith

    Just curious – what’s a chook?

    • http://onlinemediasupport.com Marcelle Paisley

      It is Australian for chickem ;)

      • http://onlinemediasupport.com Marcelle Paisley

        *chicken

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  • http://themarketingspecialist.co.uk G Clark

    This is hilarious and so so true!

  • http://www.octainrecruitment.com Rachael Donohoe

    It seems like common sense though the amount of people that do this is incredible

  • http://www.themarketingspecialist.co.uk Gail Clark

    this is such a giggle

  • http://karllusbec.wordpress.com/ Karl Lusbec

    Great article Jeff,
    I am very careful about what I write on social medias. I am not on Facebook (no joke), as I do not wish to disclose any personal information. I essentially use LinkedIn and Twitter as a professional use and do not share personal info.
    Keep on the great work!

  • http://rutnastiti.blogspot.com Rut Nastiti

    Hi, I am Rut a student. My student conselor for university also us that some universities do that too, checkingyour FB. Since technology is so inovated there’s a lot of ways to get our info. So we do have to be really careful yet using social sites as wise as possible. Then I read one number there about things getting follower which looks like a scam. I can say that I have a really big curiosity and now am trapped. My twitter automatically tweets things like that and I found it really anoying so do my friend. Is there anybody here know how can I block that scam? Thank you!

  • http://keepupwiththeweb.com Sherryl Perry

    Great post! I think the gist of #19 “don’t mix business with pleasure” is so important. People can track my FB account through my LinkedIn even though I have not linked them together. That’s because in addition to branding my blog, I’m branding my name. So, even though I do mix some personal stuff with business, I’m always cognizant of the fact that (bottom-line) FB is public unless I’ve gone out of my way to keep it private. Thanks for the article. It was a fun read.

  • http://www.amandamarsh.me Amanda Marsh

    I would add to number 27 – your children’s bodily functions. I understand that people want to talk about their children, but I don’t need to know when junior had his first explosive diaper or projectile vomit. I know it’s a rite of passage, but your friends don’t view it as such.

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  • http://www.naymz.com/amardeep_yadav_1619106 Amardeep Yadav

    Awesome post.. I am agree with mostly points.

    Thanks,
    Amardeep Yadav

  • http://projectsocial.net Karen Naide

    I agree with so much of this. #24 resonated with me… I set up a FB group for our Disney Mediterranean cruise (which we took in May) and made it a private group so people couldn’t look at our list and get a list of burglary targets.

    Then I went and posted updates and pictures of our trip from Europe, so I guess I violated #23.

    Great list Jeff, thanks so much!

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  • http://lara-garuba.blogspot.com lara

    I have actually been worried about stuff like this;infact I had to go reset my privacy account settings. All these points are very important.
    Thank you

  • http://www.SellFortSmith.com Ray Nellum

    Jeff,
    I love and subscribe to your blog! I’m a real estate agent that’s trying to learn as much about social media that I can, and your information helps out so much. It’s even better that I follow you on Twitter. Thanks and I hope you continue to share such great information.

  • http://www.affiliateprogramsoftwares.com/ Affiliate Program Software

    The #30 caught me sharing not you feel like uncomfortable to share. It is better to keep what you have if your not comfortable to share it on social media or you might be caught as spam by others for not following better guidelines…

    nice share thanks for sharing….

  • jsl

    this all sounds great and I agree but unfortunately too many people do not “believe” sharing most of what you listed, is a bad idea or they assume they have privacy.. also, too many preteens and teenagers are online sharing way too many things and they have no common sense or they think it makes them look cool..

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  • David

    Agree with last comment. Young people do not understand the ramifications of sharing things that shoudn’t be on social networks.
    When they begin job hunting a few years from now these things could come back to haunt them.Once its on the web it stays there. Of course young people have always done stupid things , but they did not broadcast these to the world via social networks in form of images and text !
    Facebook is the primary issue in that users have to go under their real name.
    Think before you post !

    • Wolftracker

      I disagree about the “real name” statement … to a point – ALL of my online activity with the exception of things like Paypal, my own bank, service providers, and sites in which I purchase commodities, are under an alias last name. In point of fact, half the folks who know me in real life, only know me under this alias – I keep my legal name VERY damn private, and therefore do not invite privacy issues online in any public forums like FB, Myspace, Twitter, etc etc.

  • http://dpbloghost.com Dustin

    I have to stress the fact about putting pictures of your children online and on Facebook. That is a pretty big no no for parents. One of my clients operates a Daycare and she can not have any pictures of the children on her website. You do not want the creeps out there to know your family patterns or where your child is through out the day. As a parent it is YOUR duty to know where your children are. Do not jeopardize that information by sharing it with the world.

    • Tiffanybbear

      why are u friending creeps that’re gonna stalk yur children? pretty sure privacy settings protect WHO u share yur pics with I understand not posting pics of other peoples kids but yur own? watching who yur friends are is more critical , IMO

    • JessicasJoys

      I can understand not posting pics of your children if they are really young, however my children are all teens. I have all of my personal settings on Facebook set at private so only my friends can see these pictures and I am extremely picky about the friends I accept. My children’s settings are also on private w only friends being aloud to view their information. I think it can be a good teaching tool for them. It is good to remind them that their future employers may ask permission to view their facebook profiles. JessicasJoys.scentsy.us

      • http://www.huthwaite.com/ George Bamgbose

        RE: 16 Images and videos of your children

        I regularly post videos of my son and his football (soccer) team on social media platforms and see it as being beneficial to parents, relatives and club alike. It promotes them in a positive light and generates interest and allows them to be see on a broader stage.
        Take a look for yourself….
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sL10cdRZ60c
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8NXuZijDkFQ
        Interested in feedback on this…!
        Do you think perhaps No 16 could be fine tuned…?

  • http://blog.tkographix.com Randy Clark

    Thank you this is now our new social networking 30 point policy!

  • http://www.proqure.se/?lang=en Ryan Eriksson

    There’s a bit of debate right now regarding point 19. (Professional vs Private).

    Building personal brands today is also as equally important as branding your company. Normally, the person(s) marketing for a brand reflect as well some personality. It is unavoidable in today’s social media world not to mix professional vs private (which is not eual to business vs pleasure) contents.

    However, what each and everyone needs to think of is just simple “common-sense”. Never share something personal that could destroy your company’s image.

    Ryan Eriksson
    Marketing- and Sales Manager
    ProQure | Entremattor & Mattservice
    - for better matting services -

    http://www.proqure.se/?lang=en
    http://www.twitter.com/proqure

    • Vlasta

      I tend to agree with you Ryan, I believe people trust you and your brand more if they feel closer connection to you personally. Obviously choose how wisely what to post and how personal you really should be. Keeping it to all business is a boring and where is the Love. ;-)

    • Nabiha Zeeshan

      Agreed. More and more people are realising that choosing a field they’re not passionate about isn’t going to be fruitful. More and more people are becoming entrepreneurs. Business and personal life are getting merged into one.

      Your last sentence said it all :)

  • http://www.twitter.com/stefanysays StefanySays

    Don’t post any thoughts you have after the first glass of any kind of alcohol. In fact, step away from the technology when drinking no matter how much sense your ideas make at the time :)

  • http://kristinasaric.com/ Kristina

    I am currently in thought process of considering to separate my personal fb from business. People might like my pages but I often get friends request from the same ones too. While in principle I don’t mind and yes I can set some privacy, I have to say I am weary of this..

    @How to get more friends or followers.. it already sounds like a scam

    It is.. I can show you a few dozen sites that “sell friends and fans”.. for a fee..

  • http://www.johnleemedia.com johnleemedia

    I recommend not using the word “yummy” in any social media post unless you are under age 12.

    • Yummybum50

      This is not going to be easy….
      NOTusing the word YUMMY….
      SORRY…Going to have to….
      Happy Easter….YUMMYBUM50 Ha ha ha !! :)

      • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

        Thanks for the comment Yummy Bum :)

        • http://www.facebook.com/face.of.ainsleyjo Ainsley Jo Phillips

          I’m 60 years old and still using yummy!!! Hey!!! I’m a foodie!!! What would you expect!?!

  • http://twitter.com/hajraks Hajra Khatoon

    Regarding 21….is there anything not personal on a networking site..take the king (facebook!) for example…there are zillions of things you can “like” on it…things ranging from movies, articles, blogs, books to the really insane stuff like “I love texting when in class, Mom says get up, I say 5 more minutes, I sleep for another half hour”
    all your friends now know what your habits are, what you love, what you detest, where you are…everything…
    Its actually a matter of personal choice, people will know what you want to tell them!

  • Yeap yeap

    one thing I won’t do is argue with people over the internet like different celebs and friends actually msg each other back and forth on twitter and facebook talking s@$t to each other. Seriously, who does that? That is imature and unclassy, let’s get it together people!

  • HopsiDropsi

    I would argue point 28- Politics. If ppl wouldn’t share views about it there wouldn’t be Tunisian revolution and certainly Mubarak would be still in power in Egypt. Share political views, seek like-minded people…discuss, spread the word, share information and contacts. Good Stuff!

    • http://www.facebook.com/djchangbang Carlitos Corcho

      true! that one is debatable depending on how one believes..

    • http://www.abilitymultimedia.com Dianne Bengtson

      I’ve thought a lot about this. Lots of successful people actively participate in politics in both parties and specific movements. I suspect that you alienate some and attract others who suddenly find common values with you. Be yourself.

  • nony

    How about just not use social media or just say fuck it all and do what you want to do?

  • http://creambmp.com Diary of a Young Black Asshole

    I honestly don’t see that much…farmville in my fbook stream…weird i guess

    Plan B Pills Hit Record Sales The Morning After Valentines Day http://t.co/65iaES9 <– WOW LMAO

  • http://twitter.com/lizcable Liz Cable

    I agree very much with point 19. Have one identity (and email address used for login) for personal sites, and another for professional sites, and never let the two meet.

  • http://www.facebook.com/bryan.pollard Bryan Pollard

    You’re an idiot. Just crawl back under the rock you were under and go back to using your abacus and reading the morning paper.

  • Dr Aletta

    Somewhere I heard that FB is one of the first places prosecutors go to find evidence against the accused. There has been more than one case of parole violators tagged in photos holding firearms or doing questionable substances. Kinda funny, actually.

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  • http://contentsgeek.com Donald Arinze

    I can’t agree more with this post. Keeping it professional is a vital key to internet success. Social media will facilitate growth and development in any business when used strictly for brand promotion and as a means of professional accreditation. Treat your internet brand like any real business and i guarantee it will become one.

  • http://disqus.com/blackrocky/ Robbie M

    How about your location when you’re in the vicinity of where you live? It’s probably OK to share locations while you’re going out, but not publicly (eg. in Twitter), but that’s just me.

  • http://twitter.com/IhateMS Johnny (G) Scott ™

    I have violated number 29 many times. :D

  • linda lou who

    give me a break just unfriend work people on your facebook page and it may hurt feelings. boo hoo.

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  • rj

    Holy shnikes! I was addicted to Farmville and as I professional photog, I found many of my friends were the same (I mean we all need to check out some time). Turns out I learned some valuable lessons plenty business lessons one can take from Farmville, like investing in proper equipment (tractors and harvesters), having a (business) plan for your farm, being creative, having fun and enjoying the fruits of your labor. I shared my tips and tricks here and hope you might enjoy: http://www.kern-photo.com/index.php/2009/10/how-to-win-at-farmville-and-your-buisness/

  • http://www.watches-works.com/ omega seamaster antimagnetic

    NOTusing the word YUMMY….

    SORRY…Going to have to

  • Pavanmehta

    isnot this sick. The authoer must now write on what actually we can post. Wat’s wrong wid posting ur holiday plans or ur child’s pics or videos. i’ve seen a thousand articles on what not to write and it absolutely actually covers the entire thing which we want to share on fb. if ppl don’t share these things on fb what would they probably do.

  • Gailk

    It truly amazes me what people share on Facebook.  I have a friend who owns a business, while she keeps here personal profile very limited, she still says some very questionable things.  So much so, that when some of the mutual friends are out for coffee her posts are the subject of conversation.  If you wouldn’t say it in mixed company, for God’s sake, don’t post it on Facebook.

  • http://twitter.com/youreachmedia Jessica Thornton

    Do you have any links to the other side of this? Like 30 things you should always post on Facebook? And, I gotta disagree, I think showing kids/family is more than OK and a great way to keep other close in your lives- just use your common sense (which seems like everything on this list) and don’t make it too personal… but DO share family milestones!

  • http://thommck.wordpress.com Thom McKiernan

    I would probably disagree with more than half of these points.
    You’re social profile should be an honest representation of yourself that you share with friends and family. If your working for a company that fires you because they saw a “drunk” photo of you (which could have been digitally altered anyway) then maybe it’s better you don’t work for them.

    I see social networks (including LinkedIn) as a positive way to promote who you are and could work in your favour if you were looking for a new job.

  • http://twitter.com/BrienneTorley Brienne Torley

    Thank you for posting this!  Some very simple rules, one could say “common sense”, but common sense isn’t that common!:P

  • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

    So easy to forget these kinds of tips – so dastardly when forgetting causes you real-life trouble. Thanks for the reminders, Jeff!

  • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

    So easy to forget these kinds of tips – so dastardly when forgetting causes you real-life trouble. Thanks for the reminders, Jeff!

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  • http://www.facebook.com/pages/Maureen-ODanu/193281680703022 Maureen O’Danu

    There are two (maybe three) categories of ‘don’ts’ here: Safety (including safety from job loss) and TMI/uninteresting (to some segment).  Both are somewhat situational.  In some industries, discussing politics is a no-no, while it others it is almost demanded, so mileage may vary. ‘Mom’ bloggers often build a successful business out of what they had for breakfast, posts about their dogs, etc., so again it’s somewhat situational. 

    All that said, a combination of common sense and caution is probably the best way to go.

  • Downhillfast

    No “duck face” photos….PLEASE!

  • http://www.facebook.com/garry.morrison Garry Morrison

    When it comes to Farmville  I am an absentee landlord. My neighbors helped out for a few months, I don’t dare look. The site of rotten fruit and dead animals would be too much.

  • http://www.khaledscorner.com خالد

    I totally agree with you

  • jones

    i am from ghana and i want to add as a friend on facebook my name is jones

  • http://twitter.com/anglecta Angela Lechtenberg

    Wow. that’s a lot of don’ts. If we followed everyone’s advice, there would be no social media! How bout treat people the way you want to be treated IRL and online. If you wouldn’t share it with your “friends” in real life, don’t share it online. Remember who’s on your friends list. Or try Google+ where it’s easier to segment.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/mystiadams Mysti Adams

    If you make our profile completely private unless someone is your friend, they can’t see pics or your wall or your friends list or anything else for that matter unless they are already added to said friend’s list. And only let people you know personally be your friend on FB. Otherwise, follow the above rules.

  • http://pervarakapadiaatmoney.blogspot.com/ Pervara Kapadia

    Very good advice – must share . Thanks for this Jeff.

  • Layla

    Any kind of rant period!

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  • Chris Morley2007

    I’m sorry but much of this ignores the fact that you can select who sees the content you are posting ie you can now define your ‘circles’ of friends, family and work colleagues. Yes there is the opportunity that someone will see something not intended for them but that will be the originators fault. The word ‘social’ is key so why not share with friends pictures of you at a party etc. Keep things very seperated Facebook for social, LinkedIn for business or clearly define your ‘circle’ of friends. Use common sense. Jeff you’re behind the curve on this one. 

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1417401728 Kim Hawkins

    Just because a thought pops into your head does not mean it has to be public knowledge shared via social media.

  • Jon Schlackman

    Not putting a pic or video of your kids for grandparents to enjoy? Comon!

  • http://www.facebook.com/suzanneoehler Suzanne Oehler

    Great list, but I beg to differ on #16 and #19.  #16 Photos and videos of kids are often appreciated by friends networks and makes them feel included.  The key is to make those available to only a limited list.  #19 I used to believe that mingling facebook and linkedin connections was a bad idea, but so many people are doing it, particularly those in the social media business, that it can work.  The key here is to set up limited profiles so your business colleagues don’t see those photos/videos of your kids!

  • http://www.facebook.com/afelis Andreas Felis

    No 17 is my favourite *lol*

  • http://www.facebook.com/afelis Andreas Felis

    No 17 is my favourite *lol*

  • http://www.businessprosperitysecrets.com/ Stephanie Mojica

    This is a great post…I’m continually amazed at what people will share on Facebook, Twitter, and similar sites.

  • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

    Thanks for the comment. Quotes are great and drive a lot of feedback and retweets!

  • http://www.ohsoorganized.com/ Linda Samuels

    For confidentiality issues, you shouldn’t share particulars about the work you are doing with clients. It’s fine to share in a general, learning, informative way, but not great to say exactly what you were doing with a client that day. Where is the privacy and confidentiality for your client when you do that.

  • Joelene

    Great post Jeff, pity more people don’t read and take heed! :-)

  • http://www.thewebcitizen.com Ilias Chelidonis

    If you take all these out of the equation, you may reconsider of being social :)

  • http://www.thewebcitizen.com Ilias Chelidonis

    If you take all these out of the equation, you may reconsider of being social :)

  • http://twitter.com/Blogtipsca Enzo Testa

    no phone numbers or work related flames.

  • http://twitter.com/Blogtipsca Enzo Testa

    no phone numbers or work related flames.

  • Don Tietz

    Good post

  • Leticiacimarra

    Dont post pics with bikini and sexy posses… Remember that everything you post belongs to millions of people!!

  • Lincoln Lim

    lol, most of the items in the list are funny :)  Some of them may seem silly, but it’s so weird there are people who do it…such as flirting when your spouse is within the loop, and giving away passwords or pwd hint

  • http://www.seorus.com.au/ seo melbourne services

    good point 

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  • megscircle

    That’s a good start to a working day, thankyou for the first funny line (am not fond of cows), had to laugh. Great post and revealing too. I think ur last line just about covers it, if you are not comfortable about it, don’t share it.

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  • jared

    Once again good post very informative! hah and yes no posting when under the influence!

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  • http://twitter.com/walterama Diane Walter

    Photos of your junk. Why do so many people do this?

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  • http://twitter.com/Faocommunicare François Guignard

    Before posting anything on social medias, I guess it would be wise to use your own judgment based on how it could affect your everyday life. For instance, for some people, posting pictures of themselves revealing their most intimate parts, might be a good thing if they work in the business of adult leisures…. So, it all come to using your ownn judgment and the affect it could have on your behavior with the outside world.

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  • http://www.buyingcheap.co.uk johnjo

    I’d agree with those if they are public but just set everything to private to only your friends and I don’t see an issue of posting pictures of your kids or saying you’re going on holiday.

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  • momto2hs

    I agree with #16. I have a 10 month old daughter, and I was always iffy about posting pictures of her on facebook. You hear creepy, very real, stories, and just can’t help but proceed with caution. I finally decided against posting photos of her at all. It might seem like I don’t care about my daughter, because I don’t post pictures of her every day, but really, it’s the opposite. You can think your facebook is private all you want. It isn’t.

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  • Krithika Rangarajan

    Oh – can people stop inviting me to play Candy Crush. ;) I don’t even know what it is, but apparently every FB user – young and old – is addicted to it :P

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  • http://www.thesocialmediaexpert.in/ Thesocialmediaexpert.in

    This is great post. I would love to see more interesting tips on this site!

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