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  • Coolmitten

    I’m predicting that the print will become obselete- save the trees!

  • http://www.MediaWizardz.com/ David Alberico

    This is a great article that touches on a few great points. One, I feel that most people that submerse themselves in online blog reading are most likely also reading ebooks on their  mobile devices and tablets, through kindle apps, i tunes etc. And Two, the fact that it is so much easier to get content in the form of an ebook distributed to a mass audience means so much more is available, faster. I don’t necessarily feel printed books will disappear. There is still great value to have the actual book. For display in a home or office,  and to hold it and flip through the pages as you read. I do on the other hand think many publishers will disappear leaving only a few to produce for the small need in the far future. I use my iPad for reading blogs, the WSJ, forums, and listening to books via iTunes. I will still buy a hardcopy if its something I really want to read, for example the Thank You Economy by Gary Vaynerchuck. 

  • KirkCheyfitz

    Nice piece, Jeff, and, I believe, very timely. My first frustration with reading apps on my iPad was the widespread inability to share a paragraph or two with friends—to quote the book across the social web, adding my comments, of course. Now, it appears, that is getting fixed. And I think it is merely a small part of a new age we are entering—the age of shared media. Smart TV, IPTV, multiple shareable publishing platforms like Path, Intersect, etc. (and Facebook, of course). All of this heralds the soon-coming day when media that can’t be shared will be ignored.

  • Markclayton2

    I have an IPad 1 and found reading problematic in the sun because you can’t wear polarised sun glasses and the tablet over heats. It’s also a bit heavy. I guess the IPad 3 is lighter but has it over come these other issues? If it has then goodbye books forever!

  • http://www.yoyosocial.com/ Twitter Management

    Great! Your article was being listed as one of the top ten social media’s I Googled a while ago. 

  • http://inspiretothrive.com/ Lisa

    I have a Galaxy pad and I have not yet used it for reading books. This is the first I’ve heard of social reading, very interesting. I may download the kindle app today and try it out. Thanks for sharing this info. I think books will never be totally absolute but there will be less of them for sure.

  • Dlathamwhite

    Unless the sum total of the national population becomes connected and can afford to purchase iPads and books–there will be a need to have hard copies of books. Otherwise a serious form of elitism is going to occur within the society. This is one the major issues regarding technology that continues to be ignored by users. Would you want to deprive people the opportunity to read? What about folks who do not want an eReader?
    I think that a combintion is better than totally eliminating one for the other.

  • Pingback: What Is Social Reading? | The Involver Blog

  • freelance writers

    Social reading is the best marketing tool for independent and self published authors so far. It will allow writers to post links to their work on social media and while it is sharing their writing, it is also subtly promoting their book. These are exactly the sorts of developments in the publishing industry that traditional publishers are missing while savvy e-book authors are using them to sell books without the need for a publisher. Print on demand services will ensure that there is always a print option on books, but traditional publishers are an endangered species.

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Thanks, You have stated it very accurately and succinctly.