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  • Pingback: Personal Branding on LinkedIn: 10 Mistakes to Avoid | Jeffbullas’s Blog « AntHill by Hombre Hormiga1

  • http://twitter.com/themediabarista Mallie Hart

    A new don’t we’re seeing by people who should ABSOLUTELY know better is keyword bombing your profile. Just like SEO spamming in the code of sites of old, this even more visible act is simply gaming SEO and it won’t win you any points with me.

    • Carolyn Hyams

      Mallie, I totally agree with you. Don’t people realize it is so obvious when you look at their profile as to what they’ve done? Except it is visible, not hidden in the code.

  • http://psoshul.com/ Nicholas Papillon

    Very great article Carolyn~!! I agree very much with your points, I admit however, I was unaware of #8 being an issue… I notice the high majority of people posting their blog link to their update, AS WELL as ALL the groups they belong too… Perhaps I’ve just not encountered the group/group leader that isn’t cool with it.

    Also, as a last “addition” I would leave a point about the “Skills” feature which is new to LinkedIn. We can endorse the skills of others (IF WE TRULY RECOGNIZE THOSE SKILLS), we can be endorsed and request endorsement form others as well; Don’t forget also, you/we can +add new skills to our profiles which in turn may be endorsed by others as well… USE THAT SKILLS SECTION : )

    Potent Gratitude again Carolyn, keep up the great articles~!! (You too Jeff~!! ; )

    #7 is my “Fav” BTW~!!

    • Carolyn Hyams

      Nicholas, thanks for leaving such great feedback. And I’m so glad you touched on endorsements too. I’ve got some serious concerns about how the system can be abused. The other day, a complete stranger (but a connection of mine), endorsed me for about 6 different skills. Though it’s nice, it’s so dodgy. You can imagine who else is doing it. How do they know how brilliant (or not) I am at those skills? It’s similar to a dodgy recommendation – but even worse because it is really easy to do and you don’t have to write anything about the person.

      • http://psoshul.com/ Nicholas Papillon

        Funny you mention that, I too recognized that potential to exploit/abuse the feature, as I too, (without naming names) had an equally unsettling perception: An individual that I personally know and am connected to on LinkedIn, was recently endorsed for a skill, to which not only have I personal knowledge that the individual does NOT have the skill, but in the very recent past has failed at executing on this skill in real-world application due to absolute lack of effort/attention… At first I was a bit upset, but being the eternal optimist that I am, figured that at the least, this is a great feature, which with a bit of growth and maturity, could turn into one of the most effective/potent features on LinkedIn.

        I like you, certainly hope they can innovate a “frictionless” or at least “low friction” method/tweak to make this a feature with more clout and credibility… for now I guess we’ll just have to exercise the additional due-diligence to see “who’s endorsed” the skill of the individual we’re screening/considering.

      • http://psoshul.com/ Nicholas Papillon

        Funny you mention that, I too recognized that potential to exploit/abuse the feature, as I too, (without naming names) had an equally unsettling perception: An individual that I personally know and am connected to on LinkedIn, was recently endorsed for a skill, to which not only have I personal knowledge that the individual does NOT have the skill, but in the very recent past has failed at executing on this skill in real-world application due to absolute lack of effort/attention… At first I was a bit upset, but being the eternal optimist that I am, figured that at the least, this is a great feature, which with a bit of growth and maturity, could turn into one of the most effective/potent features on LinkedIn.

        I like you, certainly hope they can innovate a “frictionless” or at least “low friction” method/tweak to make this a feature with more clout and credibility… for now I guess we’ll just have to exercise the additional due-diligence to see “who’s endorsed” the skill of the individual we’re screening/considering.

  • http://www.jacobcurtis.co/ Jacob Curtis

    Hi Carolyn! Excellent points made in this article. I agree that recommendations are like fine wine, the longer you wait to ask for them, the better they will be! Also, the person who recommends you is putting their own reputation at stake in doing so!

    AKA don’t ask for recommendations from people who don’t know you!

    PS: You Link in #4 takes me to a wordpress login page. Might want to fix that!

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Thanks Jocob for pointing out that hyperlink error (it is now fixed). It may have been due to the fact that I was editing it from a tropical beach on Boracy in the Philippines while on holiday. :)

  • http://www.jacobcurtis.co/ Jacob Curtis

    Hi Carolyn! Excellent points made in this article. I agree that recommendations are like fine wine, the longer you wait to ask for them, the better they will be! Also, the person who recommends you is putting their own reputation at stake in doing so!

    AKA don’t ask for recommendations from people who don’t know you!

    PS: You Link in #4 takes me to a wordpress login page. Might want to fix that!

  • Pam Gould

    Hi Carolyn. Thanks for the great article. I’m new to LinkedIn, new to social media, new to business, and it feels like arriving at a dinner party just in time for pudding. So lovely to have a quick reference guide to LinkedIn etiquette.

    • Carolyn Hyams

      I’m thrilled to hear that Pam. BTW, arriving at “pudding” time sounds good to me – At least you’ll benefit from everyone else’s experience.

  • Carolyn Hyams

    Hi Mann. Thanks for the positive feedback. Regarding your query about #4, I think firstly you need to question why you want to connect with a complete stranger. It’s always better to connect with someone when you have some sort of “other connection” or a valid reason to connect with them. Instead of using the “friend” option (which they might reject), why don’t you google their name and see what comes up. Maybe they have a blog, or a Twitter account for example. There might be a better alternative when connecting.

  • http://twitter.com/NolinBPO Nolin BPO

    I’ve committed the mistake of inviting other LinkedIn users using the default setting. Thanks for the tips, I’ve learned a lot, eh. :)

    • Carolyn Hyams

      Fantastic. Thanks for letting me know Nolin

      • http://twitter.com/NolinBPO Nolin BPO

        Welcome Carolyn, and keep posting great and informative blog posts. :)

    • http://twitter.com/TintSupplier Tint Supplier

      I’ve done that mistake too. Well, not anymore.

  • http://www.socialbakers.com/ Peter Kelly

    These are all very good tips. Thanks for writing this, Carolyn. I have some 100+ connections on LinkedIn and I, personally, may have invited a half them to connect to me, however, only with the default message. After I read your article, I now see what difference it makes when you spend the time writing you own personalized message for the people. Thanks again for this article.

    • Carolyn Hyams

      Thanks for the positive feedback Peter. Glad you found the post useful

  • http://twitter.com/James_Mayes James Mayes

    #3 – Pretty sure Bill Boorman did a research piece on this one recently and found he got a far higher rate of acceptance with standard text that he did with something personalised. Is there any research behind this recommendation, or going on gut feel?

    • Carolyn Hyams

      Definitely going on my feeling about this (and hearing many complaints from others) James. No hard stats.

    • http://twitter.com/Stacy_Nel Stacy Nelson

      This is really useful. Currently, with smartphone technology, I do sent out “cold connects” as a networking tool, and I do see a good return on this. However I always, ALWAYS message new connections to say hello and thanks and, if it’s not clear, why I chose to connect with them.

  • http://www.facebook.com/margo.bastow Margo Bastow

    Thanks for the reminders!

  • ardmoredc

    Optimizing your LinkedIn Skills & Expertise is new way to get your profile / small business on top of Google search. Top 100 #LinkedIn Skill List. Management #1 Where does your skill rank? ow.ly/f2d9n

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  • http://twitter.com/HiddenValleyRV Hidden Valley RVPark

    Another thought: Once you know their interests you may try to connect through groups that would benefit you both. Once you share a group you have an “in” to connect.

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  • http://twitter.com/EvaMArmborst Eva M. Armborst

    Thank you for the tips! I actually did the mistake of using the default message as well – I currently improved my profile and added more detailed descriptions, but I think it can still need some refining…

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  • http://www.rishona.net/blog/ Shona

    It’s a shame that people have to be specifically told not to lie. I was frankly shocked to find out that about 1/4 of the people I talked to about resume said outright that it’s “ok” to embellish a little. I myself have never, ever done that (wouldn’t even think of it). Not only because it is wrong, but because getting caught would absolutely mortify me!

    • Steven Feeney

      However, a friend of mine went to work for one of the big tech companies and the recruiter said he would not hire people who didn’t lie a little…it showed salesmanship.

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  • Gina

    Your article says: , if you’re doing the following, you’re NOT doing your “Brand You” any favours”. You have “Don’t Lie” as one of the items. I get what you mean, but it you follow what you wrote, you’re basically saying “If you don’t lie, you’re NOT doing your Brand You any favors!” :)

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  • http://twitter.com/TintSupplier Tint Supplier

    Thanks for the LinkenIn information. I should spend more time there.

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  • Gennia Holder

    Thank you for sharing this. The number of invitations I receive from strangers with no personalized intro had my shorts in a bunch and I was like a mad scientist in the lab when I wrote an article about “Minding Your Manners On LinkedIn”. I have about 40 connection requests sitting there now that I’m about to delete. http://goo.gl/Xa6ja

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  • http://www.ideatoopen.com/ Elijah R. Young

    Hey Carolyn,

    I just wanted to stop by and say thanks for writing this article, and that I just quoted and referenced it in my show today. Everyone was very happy with the show.

    I used the ‘Don’t use default text’ tip for this show, but wouldn’t mind showcasing other articles from you if the opportunity arises. You can check out the show here: http://bit.ly/14HVcCm

    @elijahryoung:disqus

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  • philhill

    nice jeff

  • Alexandria Trusov

    Overall – great post. Two notes 1) Be YOU. Do not use your personal LI page as your Company’s page. (LI has Company pages for that purpose, to highlight your brand, which people can choose to follow.) LinkedIn is about connecting people. 2) Expanding on your #9 – LinkedIn is not Facebook. Please do not spam your connections FB style personal posts about your kids or life philosophy or joke of the day. (And this is why I use “hide” button – which means people like me won’t see your actual important updates because we stopped reading them long ago.)

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  • Michael Ivers

    Thank you Carolyn. I have been a LinkedIn user for almost 10 years and frequently discover something about it I didn’t know or could be user to greater benefit.
    As for what I do, I always send a note with an invitation. I have a great memory for names and faces and where we worked, yet many aren’t so endowed. I also thank everyone who accepts an invitation.
    I sometimes do use the Friend option because I have connections that I never worked with but have known for a very long while.
    I am not certain that anyone’s profile is ever considered as 100% complete. If there is such a level, I am lost as to what else I need to include.
    Now for a few peeves: people who do not respond to personalized invitations, people who do not respond to InMail, people who view my profile as anonymous. Also, why I have initiated 95% of my connections.
    Last, much as Brandaide commented, I would like to know whether or not all I have done has resulted in greater visibility and marketability of myself.

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  • WillA

    I agree with most of this, but Facebook and Twitter might be used merely for personal use, so why include links to them on LinkedIn? I don’t think that my professional contacts or potential contacts need to know what my wife looks like or how many mouths I need to feed.

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  • http://www.scribblestudio.biz/ Holly Larson

    I’d add this one: Don’t ask someone for a LinkedIn connection, posing as a legitimate business contact, only to follow-up with an immediate product push or request for help. Ugh.

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