Four Smart Strategies to Help You Engage With More of The Right People on LinkedIn

If you’re on LinkedIn, you’re a member of the world’s largest business networking site for professionals.Four Smart Strategies To Help You Engage With More Of The Right People On LinkedIn

With over 200 million people using LinkedIn you need to find ways of building relationships with the right people so that you can make good use of this platform.

Of course, the first thing you need to do is to decide who you want to engage with: prospective clients, your next employer, strategic business partners, professionals in your industry etc. Once you who you want to attract you will need a plan to make sure you don’t waste your time and your efforts when you’re using LinkedIn.

Incorporate the following strategies into that plan and you’ll stand more chance of success.

# 1. Make A Good First Impression

You don’t get much time to make a first impression on LinkedIn or anywhere else. When people find your profile via a search or by accident they will look at your photograph and at your professional headline. In two to three seconds they will have decided whether or not to read further. You have one image plus 120 characters to inform the reader of:

  •  Your role
  • The level at which you work
  • Your industry sector
  • The value you deliver.

Here’s how I use my 120 characters. 

Linked In Bio 120 characters

With your image and your professional headline you’re trying to show that you’re a professional person. You want to help the people viewing your profile to decide that they want to connect with you, to contact you, to read more about you and so on.

Spend time getting your message right and practise squeezing more information into your 120 characters.

You will be rewarded for your efforts.

#2. Use Relevant Key Words

Before you start writing your summary and the information about your career, your company and your work think about the key words you intend to use as you write your profile. You will use these words in the job title fields, in project headings, in your list of skills and expertise and in the text that you write – just like when you’re writing a web page.

Be specific. If I’m looking for an EU VAT Taxation Specialist on LinkedIn (and I recently sourced such a person for a client) I would not have found you, if you had just called yourself an accountant in your profile.

Likewise, if you describe yourself as an executive coach, I won’t know that you’re an expert in conflict resolution, dispute resolution and employment tribunal avoidance unless you tell me.

LinkedIn is the place to be specific with the terms you use about yourself and your abilities.

Write in the language of the people you want to find you. Explain, for example, that you help newly appointed executives to transition from management roles to board level responsibilities and include several references to what you do so that your expertise will show up in LinkedIn searches.

Use the skills and expertise area, too. Use key word terms that you hope your target audience. They will find you more easily if you work in this way. 

Skills on LinkedIn

#3. Be Visual

LinkedIn is nudging us all to be more visual in our approach to using the platform, whether we’re producing company pages or working on individual profiles. Follow the advice.

Upload images, videos and presentations to supplement the text you write. This will help to build your credibility on LinkedIn.

You’ll demonstrate that you know what you’re talking about and that you can deliver. For example, if you’re a professional speaker, video clips of you delivering a presentation will underline your abilities.

Make it visual on LinkedIn

#4. Use Updates Effectively

Even if you have a great profile and a fantastic company page, you won’t engage with enough of the right people on LinkedIn, if you wait for them to find you. What you need to do is to post updates that will be of interest to your chosen target audience.

Don’t simply post a link to the latest article in a newspaper or other authoritative source. Write something about the update. Offer an opinion about why it is important. Ask a question. Explain why you’re taking the position you’re taking in your blog post. Make the news story part of your communication. Don’t just repost something you have read elsewhere.

Don’t stop there. Use the “like” function and the “comment” function to show you pay attention to the updates of people in your community. Share relevant content on your profile and in the groups to which you belong. Again, make a point with your update. Show that you are an interesting person with well-thought-out opinions that are worth listening to. Don’t just join in the conversation. Start one, and because you’re on LinkedIn, make it a meaningful conversation.


The majority of people on LinkedIn don’t use the platform well. Their profiles are badly written and they don’t know how build, or to engage with, a professional community. If you follow any of the strategies here, you will get ahead of a lot of people on LinkedIn. You’ll also be starting to make LinkedIn work for you.

I know LinkedIn works for me and for my business. See how you can use it to help you. Which of these strategies do you think will help you to make a big impact on LinkedIn quickly? You’re welcome to share your thoughts and your plans below.

Guest author: Margaret Adams is a content marketing strategist and a speaker on inbound marketing topics. She helps professional practices in the UK build a strong online presence. Find out more about her at

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  • jennifer illustre

    Thank you very much for the tips. I never really paid attention to it before because I hate bragging about my credentials nor overpimping my job title.

    • Margaret Adams

      It’s important to have the confidence to tell the world when you do something well. That’s not bragging. It’s just being honest.

  • Amber King

    Thank you for sharing these tips Jeff. These are great ways in order to be noticed on LinkedIn. It cannot be denied that it is one of the best place to generate leads.

  • Oliver Scott

    Hi Jeff,

    It simply a creative technique for building our account into noticeable way. It can help us drive a traffic unto our page that implies leads to our business with the right customers. Thanks for Imparting :)

  • Acid42

    #4 is wise. Links with commentary give more value to followers. And give you the chance to be catty.

  • Suzanne Mannion

    Great points and examples of how social media platforms are evolving and ways in which we can utilize them to tell our message – no longer words here, visuals there – can tell our story more comprehensively (which is more effective)

  • Joyce Feustel

    What I especially appreciated about your piece, Margaret, was your emphasis on specificity and personalizing comments on LinkedIn. I will take that advice to heart and apply it.

    Joyce Feustel

  • LinkedBusiness

    Great strategies Margaret. I agree that the majority of people on LinkedIn are using it poorly so it’s easy for a professional to stand out if they implement a few optimizing strategies.

  • Woomera

    Personally, I think the Net is flooded with such advice & it’s little help at all except to 60+yo technophobes discovering the Internet for the first time.

    “I think Understanding Personal Branding, beats ‘LinkedIn Profile’s that rock’ advice”

  • Casa Sana

    As an international nonprofit, we are still working out strategies for the best way to utilize LinkedIn as a platform for social networking with other like-minded professionals. The difficulty of separating prior work history as a real estate agent, with nonprofit work I currently do nowis quite a struggle.