13 Quick Tricks to Drive Traffic to Your Blog in Minutes

Rabbit out of a hat - tricks to drive traffic to your blog

It happens to the best of bloggers.

You produce stellar content that’s helpful and easy to read.

You even publish a blog post a week – or more – to prove you’re serious about blogging.

You genuinely care about your audience.

But sometimes, despite doing everything by the book, the traffic’s a dud.

That’s when the questions start – am I good enough to be doing this? Heck, does blogging even work as a legitimate business model? Am I wasting my time?

If that’s you, let me clear the air by quoting Jon Morrow, “Each and every one of us decides who we are. No, you may not be ready to be a popular blogger now, but you can become ready.”

Blogging works. We’ve seen a lot of proof around us for that. The problem is not blogging; it is doing things that don’t yield trust or traffic to your blog.

You see, a decade ago you could crank out a 300-word piece and get more content published, left, right and center. In those days, just having something published meant you could attract huge traffic. Because not many were doing it.

Gradually, the world caught up and more people started putting out better content. Longer, more in depth, more useful content. Bloggers started calling it “epic posts”.

Today, most of the world has caught up with “epic”. It’s no longer a differential point. It’s a given.

The secret to attracting more traffic is doing what others are not doing, or unwilling to do yet.

And what if I told you it could be done in under 30 minutes?

To make it easier for you, I have compiled a list of 13 quick tricks to drive traffic to your blog in minutes:

1. Add drama to your work

Spice things up by telling a story or starting out with a metaphor. Kevin Duncan of Be a Better Blogger uses this technique like no other. His posts open with engaging anecdotes that establish a connection with his readers right at the beginning.

The result? A hooked reader.

It happens to the best of bloggers.  You produce stellar content that’s easy to understand and even “skimmable” for the typical online reader.   You even publish a blog post a week – or more – to prove you’re serious about blogging.  You genuinely care about your audience.  But sometimes, despite doing everything by the book, the traffic’s a dud.  That’s when the questions start – am I good enough to be doing this? Heck, does blogging even work as a legitimate business model? Am I wasting my time? If that’s you, let me clear the air by quoting Jon Morrow, “Each and every one of us decides who we are. No, you may not be ready to be a popular blogger now, but you can become ready.” Blogging works. We’ve seen a lot of proof around us for that. The problem is not blogging; it is doing things that don’t yield trust or traffic to your blog.  You see, a decade ago you could crank out a 300-word piece and get more content published, left, right and center. In those days, just having something published meant you could attract huge traffic. Because not many were doing it.  Gradually, the world caught up and more people started putting out better content. Longer, more indepth, more useful content. Bloggers started calling it “epic posts”. Today, most of the world has caught up with “epic”. It’s no longer a differential point. It’s a given.  The secret to attracting more traffic is doing what others are not doing, or unwilling to do yet. And what if I told you it could be done under 30 minutes? To make it easier for you, I have compiled a list of 13 quick ways to drive traffic to your blog in minutes: 1. Add drama to your work. Spice things up by telling a story or starting out with a metaphor. Kevin Duncan of Be a Better Blogger uses this technique like no other. His posts open with engaging anecdotes that establish a connection with his readers right at the beginning. The result? A hooked reader.   2. Pick a topic that attracts traffic. Needless to say, if your topic is dull, you are not going to attract much traffic any time soon. Start with Google Trends, BuzzSumo and Feedly to research what’s in demand. I suggest the “three-circle strategy” to pick a topic/niche when you’re starting out. Here’s how it works: Draw three circles on a piece of paper. In the first circle, write down all areas you’re knowledgeable about. In the second, write what interests you. And in the third circle, pick topics from the above two circles that are in demand. Your sweet spot is where the three intersect.    3. Analyze your headlines before hitting “publish”. Use a headline analyzer like CoSchedule. Once you are done writing the post, copy-paste your draft headline into the free tool. It’s super-quick and effective.  Once you punch in a headline, the tool assigns it a “Headline Score”. It also gives your headline a grade based on the overall structure, grammar and readability. The report dissects your headline into “common words”, “uncommon words”, “emotional words” and “power words”. It tells you your headline “type” (this post is a “list type”) and does a length analysis. Lastly, you get some cool tips to improve your headline, all for free and in under a few minutes. Here’s a screenshot of this post’s headline analysis:     4. Go visual. Why? Because the human brain craves visuals. The last time I checked, humans had a shorter attention span (8 seconds) than that of a goldfish (9 seconds). The proof lies in the wildly popular visual platforms such as Facebook Timeline, Instagram and Pinterest.  We’re drowning in words and don’t have enough time to read every single blog post out there. If visuals, such as memes, videos, infographics, comics etc, can help you retain attention, why not give them a try? Visme, Canva and Vine are just a few tools to get started under minutes. For example, using templates in Visme, you can create stellar infographics for free within minutes. 5. Improve your blog’s loading time. As you probably know, Google considers loading time as an important factor in ranking websites. Research shows that 47% readers now expect a page to load in 2 seconds. Let’s start with the low lying fruit – the first thing you want to do is reduce the number of plugins you use. Plugins make your blog sluggish, so unless absolutely necessary, get rid of extra add-ons. Replace these with an all-in-one plugin, such as Jetpack for a more efficient loading time.  Compress images using Smush.it or use BJ Lazy Load for an image to load conditionally when the reader scrolls to the bottom of the page. An alternative is to use a CDN or a Content Delivery Network which is a network of webservers such as Incapsula.  6. Make social sharing easy. A recent study found that using social sharing buttons on posts leads to 7X more mentions. Start with writing magnetic headlines that are short and brief (for platforms such as Twitter so there’s room for shortened URLs). Include hashtags and usernames when appropriate.  7. Join HARO and answer relevant queries. HARO or Help a Reporter is a “free publicity” service dedicated to bringing reporters and qualified sources together. As a blogger, you can be a story lead or an expert source for a reporter query. Signing up is free and it takes less than 10 minutes to briefly answer a HARO query, which can result in high-quality inbound links to your blog. 8. Convert a visitor into a lead. Add a solid call-to-action at the end of your posts that urges them to either read another of your other posts, subscribe to your list, click a link to a landing page – do something. Here’s an example:   Source: Forbes.com. Use TrenDemon to add customizable calls-to-action based on visitors’ realtime engagement. It’s made up of several algorithms that analyze and identifies the pages that bring in most traffic and engagement, and helps optimize your marketing ROI. A landing page is a dedicated page to convert a reader into a subscriber by offering a “freebie” or a “lead magnet”. A great alternative is GetResponse’s Landing Page Maker. Short on budget? You can try LaunchEffect, a free launch theme, and start collecting leads even before you’ve launched a blog. Of course, this post is about attracting traffic, so how does collecting leads help? It does — because once you have a thriving list you can always direct them to your blog through a series of well-written autoresponders and emails. 9. Come up with the optimum number of posts, then stick to it. What’s the optimum number? Research shows that the more a company blogged per month, the more traffic it attracted. On the flip side, how much is too much? One of the easiest ways to figure it out is to watch your subscriber activity closely. Are you getting many unsubscribe requests because of “too much posting” like this blogger? His quick case study will help you to find your minimum viable posting. 10. Start a forum on your website. An active forum will not only serve as a useful community to your readers but also attract new traffic with the help of natural longtail keywords that go into it.  To do a quick search of active and popular forums in your niche, just search for your keyword + forum. Then, all you have to do is create a free account on the best forum(s) and use your brand name as a nickname. You can start contributing as well as studying these forums before you launch your own.  Starting your own forum is easy. For WordPress, you can install the free bbPress plugin. Here is a tutorial to set up bbPress in under minutes. 11. Connect with bloggers who send you traffic and ask them if they can promote you in other ways (and vice versa). Monitor Backlinks is a neat tool for SEO and web marketers. It notifies you every time you gain or lose a backlink; every time your competitor gains a high-value backlink and compares ranking with your competitors. 12. Respond to your blog comments thoughtfully. According to Neil Patel, responding to comments increases your traffic. The more you respond, the more number of words accumulate on the page. This is ideal from an SEO-perspective. Not only that, repeat traffic also builds over time because they look forward to new posts and even become subscribers to keep updated. You can also control your traffic by adding a link in the comment URL box and directing them where you want. Neil increased visits to his “About” page by 5,137 visits a month by simply using this feature of the comment box. Here is a useful guide to help you deal with different types of comments you get on the blog.  13. Build up your professional brand on Quora. It’s a great place to answer questions and build a legitimate following. You get immediate exposure to 1.5 million monthly visitors, and add links to your blog posts and articles as resources in your answers.  If you know everything about your topic, answering a question shouldn’t take you more than 15 minutes. You want to follow all related topics too, just in case. You can also join in relevant conversations and educate your prospects better about your service/product (of course, no spamming). Here’s a teaser for topic Content Marketing (Fair warning: It can be addictive!):    The Bottom Line I want to challenge you to try these techniques. Of course, not all of them will work for you so pick and choose a handful and run with it. Gaining new traffic sounds like a lot of work, but it’s worth every minute. And with the above tips, you can boost traffic in 30 minutes or less. You may not feel it happen immediately, but stay consistent. You’ll see the results. Eventually, the more you do these techniques, the more trust you will build. Writing epic posts is no longer enough – you want the right audience to read them too.

2. Pick a topic that attracts traffic

Needless to say, if your topic is dull, you are not going to attract much traffic any time soon. Start with Google Trends, BuzzSumo and Feedly to research what’s in demand. I suggest the “three-circle strategy” to pick a topic/niche when you’re starting out.

Here’s how it works:

Draw three circles on a piece of paper. In the first circle, write down all areas you’re knowledgeable about. In the second, write what interests you. And in the third circle, pick topics from the above two circles that are in demand.

Your sweet spot is where the three intersect.

Venn diagram - Drive traffic to your blog

3. Analyze your headlines before hitting “publish”

Use a headline analyzer like CoSchedule. Once you are done writing the post, copy and paste your draft headline into the free tool. It’s super-quick and effective.

Once you punch in a headline, the tool assigns it a “Headline Score”. It also gives your headline a grade based on the overall structure, grammar and readability. The report dissects your headline into “common words”, “uncommon words”, “emotional words” and “power words”. It tells you your headline “type” (this post is a “list type”) and does a length analysis. Lastly, you get some cool tips to improve your headline, all for free and in under a few minutes.

Here’s an example:

Headline analyzer - Drive traffic to your blog

Headline analyzer 2 - Drive traffic to your blog

4. Go visual

Why? Because the human brain craves visuals. The last time I checked, humans had a shorter attention span (8 seconds) than that of a goldfish (9 seconds). The proof lies in the wildly popular visual platforms such as Facebook Timeline, Instagram and Pinterest.

We’re drowning in words and don’t have enough time to read every single blog post out there. If visuals, such as memes, videos, infographics, comics etc, can help you retain attention, why not give them a try?

Visme, Canva and Vine are just a few tools to get started in under minutes. For example, using templates in Visme, you can create stellar infographics for free within minutes.

5. Improve your blog’s loading time

As you probably know, Google considers loading time as an important factor in ranking websites. Research shows that 47% of readers now expect a page to load in 2 seconds.

Let’s start with the low lying fruit – the first thing you want to do is reduce the number of plugins you use. Plugins make your blog sluggish, so unless absolutely necessary, get rid of extra add-ons. Replace these with an all-in-one plugin, such as Jetpack for a more efficient loading time.

Compress images using Smush.it or use BJ Lazy Load for an image to load conditionally when the reader scrolls to the bottom of the page. An alternative is to use a CDN or a Content Delivery Network which is a network of webservers such as Incapsula.

6. Make social sharing easy

A recent study found that using social sharing buttons on posts leads to 7 times more mentions. Start with writing magnetic headlines that are short and brief (for platforms such as Twitter so there’s room for shortened URLs). Include hashtags and usernames when appropriate.

7. Join HARO and answer relevant queries

HARO or Help a Reporter is a “free publicity” service dedicated to bringing reporters and qualified sources together. As a blogger, you can be a story lead or an expert source for a reporter query. Signing up is free and it takes less than 10 minutes to briefly answer a HARO query, which can result in high-quality inbound links to your blog.

8. Convert a visitor into a lead

Add a solid call-to-action at the end of your posts that urges them to either read another of your posts, subscribe to your list, click a link to a landing page – do something.

Here’s an example:

Lead example - Drive traffic to your blog

Source: Forbes.com.

Use TrenDemon to add customizable calls-to-action based on visitors’ realtime engagement. It’s made up of several algorithms that analyze and identifies the pages that bring in most traffic and engagement, and helps optimize your marketing ROI.

A landing page is a dedicated page to convert a reader into a subscriber by offering a “freebie” or a “lead magnet”. A great alternative is GetResponse’s Landing Page Maker.

Short on budget? You can try LaunchEffect, a free launch theme, and start collecting leads even before you’ve launched a blog.

Of course, this post is about attracting traffic, so how does collecting leads help? It does — because once you have a thriving list you can always direct them to your blog through a series of well-written autoresponders and emails.

9. Come up with the optimum number of posts, then stick to it

What’s the optimum number? Research shows that the more a company blogged per month, the more traffic it attracted.

On the flip side, how much is too much? One of the easiest ways to figure it out is to watch your subscriber activity closely. Are you getting many unsubscribe requests because of “too much posting” like this blogger? His quick case study will help you to find your minimum viable posting.

10. Start a forum on your website

An active forum will not only serve as a useful community to your readers but also attract new traffic with the help of natural longtail keywords that go into it.

To do a quick search of active and popular forums in your niche, just search for your keyword + forum. Then, all you have to do is create a free account on the best forum(s) and use your brand name as a nickname. You can start contributing as well as studying these forums before you launch your own.

Starting your own forum is easy. For WordPress, you can install the free bbPress plugin. Here is a tutorial to set up bbPress in under minutes.

11. Connect with bloggers who send you traffic

Monitor Backlinks is a neat tool for SEO and web marketers. It notifies you every time you gain or lose a backlink; every time your competitor gains a high-value backlink and compares ranking with your competitors.

12. Respond to your blog comments thoughtfully

According to Neil Patel, responding to comments increases your traffic. The more you respond, the more number of words accumulate on the page. This is ideal from an SEO-perspective. Not only that, repeat traffic also builds over time because they look forward to new posts and even become subscribers to keep updated.

You can also control your traffic by adding a link in the comment URL box and directing them where you want. Neil increased visits to his “About” page by 5,137 visits a month by simply using this feature in the comment box.

Here is a useful guide to help you deal with different types of comments you get on the blog.

13. Build up your professional brand on Quora

It’s a great place to answer questions and build a legitimate following. You get immediate exposure to 1.5 million monthly visitors, and add links to your blog posts and articles as resources in your answers.

If you know everything about your topic, answering a question shouldn’t take you more than 15 minutes. You want to follow all related topics too, just in case. You can also join in relevant conversations and educate your prospects better about your service/product (of course, no spamming).

Here’s a teaser for the topic Content Marketing (Fair warning: It can be addictive!):

Quora example to drive traffic to your blog

The bottom line

I want to challenge you to try these techniques. Of course, not all of them will work for you so pick and choose a handful and run with it.

Gaining new traffic sounds like a lot of work, but it’s worth every minute. And with the above tips, you can boost traffic in 30 minutes or less. You may not feel it happen immediately, but stay consistent. You’ll see the results.

Eventually, the more you do these techniques, the more trust you will build. Writing epic posts is no longer enough – you want the right audience to read them too.

Guest Author: Pooja Lohana is an Online Business Coach + Writer & Editor. She helps entrepreneurs shine their blog and copy, and simplifies online marketing so they can make more sales and live the Un-9-5 life. Check out her step-by-step course on breaking into freelance writing.

Comments

  • http://earnz.net/ Saqib Ahmad

    Realy nice share! Thank You

  • http://devjuic.com Stephen Fiser

    Really encouraging. Just getting started and it’s easy to start doubting.

  • http://singapur.spidersweb.pl Karol Kopańko

    Great list Pooja!

    I have something to add to your fourth point about going visual as a crucial point of engaging users. There are many success stories of publishers achieving great results with quizzes, just consider BuzzFeed or New York Times. Back in time to create attractive quiz you had to work with programmer, but nowadays there are tools enabling you to make it on your own in a snap 😉

    I recommend you to use this one: https://4screens.net/engageform
    created by a company that I’m working for.

    Moreover at the end of each quiz you can put social buttons (to make sharing easy) and a box to leave a-mail address for a newsletter (to convert quiz taker into lead).

  • http://beabetterblogger.com Kevin Duncan

    Hi Pooja and Jeff,

    First off, Jeff, thank you for letting Pooja share her pearls of wisdom on your site. I “discovered” her last year after she’d written a guest post for Darren Rowse, and I was immediately impressed. I left her a comment, reached out to her, and have been a fan of her content ever since. (Also, apropos of nothing, but even though you and I follow each other on Twitter, I’ve just *now* subscribed to your list and liked your Facebook page, Jeff. Not sure what took me so long!)

    Pooja, thank you SO MUCH for the shout out in this excellent guest post you’ve written. It’s a thrill every time I discover someone has mentioned me or linked to me. Hopefully, it’s a feeling that never gets old. Thank you for making my day. :-)

    These are 13 great tips you have shared with us. The “forum” strategy is one I haven’t yet utilized, but it’s one I should consider. Heck, I need to start participating in forums PERIOD. I’ve neglected them for whatever reason.

    One tip I would add? SlideShare. (But keep that one under your hat. It’s a secret.)

    I’ll be sharing this on my Facebook page as soon as I click “post” on this comment. Pooja, Jeff, thank you. Hope you both have great weekends!

    -Kevin

  • Matlab help

    My
    friend recommended this blog and he was totally right keep up the fantastic
    work!

    Matlab Assignment
    Help

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Glad you are enjoying it! :)

  • foreverafs

    good effort on the list….unlike other ones i have seen

  • TheNews Click

    Hi Pooja,

    I enjoyed reading this. Indeed, my blog does not have the traffic like a pro blogger yet, but I’m trying to improve it.
    And
    for blog comments, even though you do not say something like that, I
    still reply to any comments entered in my blog thoughtfully. I reply to
    them sincerely even when I’m busy with a thing.

    I appreciate those who are willing to provide their time to comment on my blog. That is why I treat them like that. :)

    Thanks for sharing. Have a great week ahead!

    Regards,
    Thenewsclick.com

  • http://david.writerlife.me david

    Pooja- This is “epic” in it’s own way! The introduction of a story is a tactic I’d thought of but have yet to employ. Also, thanks for the list of resources to use, I hadn’t thought about something as simple as using Google Trends before, so I can’t wait to see how it works for my blog.

  • Gabriel

    Your post is quite inspiring, I’ve gained fresh insight that will enable me build my inspirational blog, http://ObinnaOnyenali.com. Thanks.