Is Podcasting the Hot New Media Trend? – Case Study

Fads are exciting and the world of fashion feeds off the energy and opportunity that it brings.Is Podcasting the Hot New Media Trend - Case Study

Fashion items that were droll and ugly can go from sales bin to sales headline because they have somehow tapped into a viral word of mouth frenzy.

Who would have imagined that the “Crocs” shoes that only Minnie and Mickey Mouse would wear could become fashionable on seven continents.

I didn’t.

In fact I still haven’t bought my first pair because I am allergic to plastic and ugliness.

Who would also have thought that the skinny jeans that I wore as a teenager would make a return as a fashionistas staple diet in 2013. Predicting fads, fashions and trends is sometimes frustrating and very unpredictable.

Skinny and plastic. It used to be flares and platforms.

Podcasting returns

Podcasting was cool when I started the blog four years ago but as social media became fashionable Facebook and Twitter made podcasting look a tad obsolescent and dowdy.

Not sexy or trendy was the phrase that crossed my mind.

So why is podcasting having a resurrection? It is due to two key factors.

  1. The growth and rapid adoption of smart phones. You can now get your podcast direct to your phone without having to hook up your iPod to the computer.
  2. The explosive growth of an online media portal where you can publish and download your podcasts…. called “iTunes”

These have provided the device and the channel to make podcasting effective, efficient and able to be distributed with ease that was only imagined years ago.

Who is doing podcasting well?

Podcasting can take many forms and style. Just like Crocs and platform shoes. It depends on what type of media preference, flavour and voice that  you find attracts. A lot like choosing your favourite radio station.

In fact that is what podcasting is.  21st century radio channels that you can listen to in your car, at the gym or on the beach.

Here is a case study of podcasting success that I discovered while attending the Social Media Marketing World in San Diego. Why is it emerging as a hot new trend?

According to Michael Stelzner from Social Media Examiner when they conducted a recent social media study discovered

“that even though only 3% of marketers are currently using podcasting in their social media marketing strategy… 32% have a desire to learn how to use podcasting in their marketing efforts and 23% have plans to increase their podcasting activities in 2013.” 

Add this to the growth of smart phones and the adoption on iTunes and you have a strong podcasting marketplace with a large upside.

So let’s find out about podcasting success.

Pat Flynn – Smart Passive Income podcast

Pat operates a very successful blog at “Smart Passive Income” which as you have already guessed by the name is about creating passive income from focused blogging and content creation. He started his podcast 18 months after buying the equipment. Due to the fear of creating a personal podcast. So even successful bloggers are human!

Introduced in July 2010 its listeners have given it more than 500 five-star ratings. Mr. Flynn consistently ranks in the top 10 business podcasts on iTunes, including, at one point, earning a second place spot behind The Dave Ramsey Show (iTunes doesn’t explain how it ranks podcasts).

His marketing philosophy is based on what he calls the “Exposure Cycle“.

The Exposure Cycle

Here are the 3 steps to exposing your podcast to the world and some of his insights on what is required to make a podcast successful.

1. Discoverability

To get exposure you need to be discovered.

He does this by:

  • Making sure that the podcast is optimised for search engines with a keyword rich title, description and meta data. Also he optimises it on iTunes for SEO.
  • Creating professional artwork which should be like the cover of a quality book
  • Pursuing tactics that assist in getting the show rated and ranked in the top 10 on iTunes

2. Stickability

Podcasts are much more sticky than an article on your blog as they keep people hanging around (the podcast manages to do that well for an hour). A blog post is read in a few minutes.

So how does he make it sticky?

  • Works hard on creating a great first impression with the best quality sound he can create.
  • Relevant information without fluff
  • Inject your personality
  • Valuable content that is actionable and provides listeners with takeaways that  answer the question of “what’s in it for me?”
  • Social proof (he displays that there have been 3 million downloads and the fact that 50,000 subscribers regularly listen to his weekly podcast)
  • Keeps them involved by voice techniques that make people “lean in” by repeating important points and dynamic voice changes from whisper to loud.
  • Breaks the one hour podcast into 4 sections and signals the next transition with “Next we are going to talk about

 3. Shareability

I don’t know how many times I have dropped into a blog and tried to find the social sharing buttons and discovered them quietly lurking down the bottom and wearing camouflage.

Any media needs to be easy to share and it isn’t just about the social sharing buttons.

So how does Pat make it easy for people to share his podcast?

  • Obvious floating sharing buttons on the side bar
  • Provides show notes
  • Implements calls to action
  • Syndicates his podcasts to to the popular podcasting directory”Stitcher”
  • Creates landing pages with their own domain name
  • He  also uses mobile optimisation which uses texting and a mobile landing page and an opt-in

If you want to learn more about podcasting from Pat you can check out his free podcasting tutorial which is six “step by step'” training videos to help you get your podcasting up and running.

Wrapping it up

Pat is not the only podcaster on the planet and in fact one of the most successful is a gentleman called Cliff Ravenscraft who podcasts under the show name “The Podcast Answerman” and has created more than 2,800 episodes since 2008. Cliff provides a 120 minutes of free instruction on how to podcast on his blog.

Still not convinced?… then there some other significant bloggers and marketers that are stepping in to podcasting including Michael Stelzner, Chris Brogan, Michael Hyatt and even Seth Godin.

Where there is smoke there is fire. Podcasting is worth checking out.

What About You?

Did you know that podcasting was making a comeback? Have you tried podcasting? Do you even listen to podcasts?

What has been your experiences?

Look forward to hearing your stories and feedback in the comments below.

Want to learn how to create great content that engages?

My book – “Blogging the Smart Way – How to Create and Market a Killer Blog with Social Media” – will show you how.

It is now available to download. I show you how to create and build a blog that rocks and grow tribes, fans and followers on social networks such as Twitter and Facebook. It also includes dozens of tips to create contagious content that begs to be shared and tempts people to link to your website and blog.

I also reveal the tactics I used to grow my Twitter followers to over 140,000.

Download and read it now.

 

Comments

  • http://smallbusinesstalent.com/ Stephen Lahey

    I launched a weekly podcast in January (with a focus on interviewing B2B sales and marketing experts). My experience with podcasting has been very positive. It’s been a great to interview and get to know people whom I admire while building my list and sharing content. New email subscribers and comments every week.

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      The power of the podcast appears to be the high engagement and intimacy that it achieves with the listener. It sounds like you have tapped into that.Stephen :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/cheval.john Cheval John

    Yes. I’m doing an online radio show called “What’s The Word?” on BlogTalkRadio. When I saw the importance of podcasting by Michael Stelzner on Social Media Examiner, it got my attention and I looked into it, but I couldn’t afford the equipment. Then I “stumbled upon “BlogTalkRadio” when I was looking for a show and I saw that you can host your own radio show and I knew that it was for me because my goal was to lift up the most influential and powerful people for this year and beyond and hosting my own show gives me the platform to do so.

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      It sounds Cheval like that you have found “your” voice. :)

      • http://www.facebook.com/cheval.john Cheval John

        Yes, I have. It’s really cool.

  • Doreen

    Jeff – you had me at “I am allergic to plastic and ugliness” – whereas I am known for my fashion posts, I couldn’t resist sharing! https://www.facebook.com/doreen.dove

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      I was trying to offend all “Croc” shoe owners and wearers but it appears I have attracted the fashionable set. :)

  • http://nickwallen.co/ Nick Allen

    Jeff, thanks for the insights. I just recently started to podcast my weekly thoughts on Sundays using Soundcloud and my phone to start with. (http://nickwallen.co/2013/04/21/podcast-sunday-session-rich-snippets-and-open-source-architecture/) .

    I was inspired by FIR (http://forimmediaterelease.biz/index.php?/weblog/comments/fir_interview_professional_insights_with_neville_hobson_and_shel_holtz) – who just released their 700th podcast. A great hour long show about PR/Tech and Digital from around the world. Would highly recommend!

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      That is great news and sounds like you are on your way!

    • Podcastcoach

      Be careful. Don’t submit your soundcloud RSS to itunes or your won’t be able to leave.

  • http://www.PuraVidaMultiMedia.com/ CAELAN HUNTRESS

    The biggest reason I want to get into podcasting is because it’s an easy opportunity to score interviews with influencers in an industry, and become a ‘hub’ for quality information on an industry topic.

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Podcasting can certainly be a great networking hub and opportunity

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Podcasting can certainly be a great networking hub and opportunity

  • http://www.PuraVidaMultiMedia.com/ CAELAN HUNTRESS

    The biggest reason I want to get into podcasting is because it’s an easy opportunity to score interviews with influencers in an industry, and become a ‘hub’ for quality information on an industry topic.

  • http://sparkvoice.wordpress.com/ DS

    I was worried that I may be the only one who hadn’t worn or owned a pair of crocs! I listen to 3 podcasts (adding a 4th) – Dan Miller, Michael Hyatt, and Jared Latigo. You’re definitely spot on about podcasting. I believe Chris Brogan mentioned potential additions to the radio from auto manufacturers as well.

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Well it looks like there are at least two of us who have come out on being non “crocced”

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Well it looks like there are at least two of us who have come out on being non “crocced”

  • http://sparkvoice.wordpress.com/ DS

    I was worried that I may be the only one who hadn’t worn or owned a pair of crocs! I listen to 3 podcasts (adding a 4th) – Dan Miller, Michael Hyatt, and Jared Latigo. You’re definitely spot on about podcasting. I believe Chris Brogan mentioned potential additions to the radio from auto manufacturers as well.

  • http://www.facebook.com/kellymccausey Kelly McCausey

    I’ve been podcasting since I heard the word and hosting an internet radio show for about a year before that. I can’t imagine building what I have without one :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/kellymccausey Kelly McCausey

    I’ve been podcasting since I heard the word and hosting an internet radio show for about a year before that. I can’t imagine building what I have without one :)

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Hi Kelly I think I could put you down as a believer :)

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Hi Kelly I think I could put you down as a believer :)

  • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

    Thanks for the shout out on Steamfeed Gerry. I will check it out

  • http://twitter.com/learntopodcast Dave Jackson

    I’ve helped hundreds of people lauch successfull podcasts. Some earn thousands every episode. Others get free flights, better insights into customers, and much more. You can see many of them at powerofpodcasting.com

  • http://www.WaxingUnLyrical.com/ Shonali Burke

    I’m allergic to Crocs too! I’m sorry it took me a few days (ok, weeks) to get here, but I laughed so much at that (and what an interesting piece on podcasts). When I think of podcasts, I always think of @hackmanj… do you know him? You should. He’s terrific.

    • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

      Thanks Shonali for dropping in and great to see your smiling face exuberant voice. Glad to hear that I am not the only one allergic to Crocs. :).

  • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

    Thanks for the insights and it would be great to catch up next time.

  • http://www.convinceandconvert.com/ jaybaer

    I create a ton of content, and have been doing so for years. Started the Social Pros podcast 1.5 years ago. It doesn’t have as big of an audience as some other things I do (like my blog), but the quality and concentration of that audience (and its loyalty) is off the charts.

  • http://brainstorminonline.com/ Bill Frank

    Who’s making money at podcasting? That’s the real question. Besides Adam Carolla or Tom Lykis or Leo Laporte—who brought large audiences with them from their radio or TV shows—who’s been able to make a good living at podcasting?

    I was in radio and was laid off (bummer). I have a large library of radio interviews I’ve done with celebrities in business, entertainment, sports, technology and politics. I serve them up at http://brainstorminonline.com.

    I want to hear from others who have successfully transitioned from a conventional job to full-time podcasting for a living.

    • Podcastcoach

      Its all about Value for Value. The No Agenda Show (Adam Curry and John C Divorak) have people donate thousands of dollars per episode as they provide insights into the news that you just can’t get on TV (but should. It’s this thing called “reporting….”)

  • Richard Vobes

    I would love t believe that Podcasting 2.0 was returning and this time with a serious means to earn a living from it. I podcast from 2005 to 2012 (The Vobes Show), nearly everyday from a beach hut on the south coast of England. I was one of the original four podcasters in the UK when it crossed the pond to our small island. I still knock out the occasional one and still do a daily podcast (The Naked Englishman – audio journal) knocking up some 3500 podcasts all told – hell I even podcast from the real Dr. Who’s Tardis on the BBC scene dock, appeared on the BBc website and in the Reader’s Digest.

    Two problems I found. First, couldn’t invest as much as I wanted in it to make it better – no income stream. (I remember when I advertised the podcast on Podcast Alley, on a banner ad, and people went ballistic telling me not to expect to make money from the medium! How they soon changed their tunes, when other started to monetize them.)
    Second, I couldn’t grow the audience. It plateaued and I struggled.

    The case for smartphones, Itunes and even Youtube, is good and I do believe, podcasting could have a voice again. The better WIFI connectivity we have the greater the chance to reach people on the move.

    Money, though. Money. Not to be rich, to fleece the audience, but to pay a simple wage, top plough into the content, to make the regular and of merit.

    I admit, I became disillusioned. I didn’t want to just reach out to geeks with podcatching software, but the rest of the world.

    I wonder if I could return to that Beach Hut….

    Richard Vobes

  • patrick dsouza

    I think a lot of us are bored with the written word. Video is good but a chore and chews up data – a problem if you re on a 3G connection.

    Podcasts or radiocasts break the monotony and can be played back in your car using blue tooth while driving home. It’s all too good to be true. Freakonomics did a great one with a Harvald professor discussing the Pope’s view on capitalism

  • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas
  • Mike White

    “What has been your experiences? — shouldn’t that be “What have been your experiences?”

  • Mike White

    *·Syndicates his podcasts to to the popular podcasting directory”Stitcher” — that’s one too many “to”s

  • Mike White

    *What has been your experiences? — I think that it should be “have” not “has”.