Buffer
  • http://www.jasonfox.me Jason Fox

    I feel intrusive or desperate asking people to like my stuff or to comment… but I guess the ol adage proves correct again… Ask and ye shall receive.

    Thanks for the insight. And Please “Like” this comment if you agree.

  • http://www.facebook.com/ivocampos Ivo Campos

    It’s
    interesting to see how the results of this kind of researches.  However, I
    always think that each company has a different reality in terms of social
    networks and what works with one company it might not work with other company.
      Even if we are talking about two companies of the same industry, the
    brand engagement with the fans of both companies could be different so that the
    number of the interactions of the fans with each brand could be different too.

    On
    the other hand, I think we should analyze the type of content of these posts.
    The interactions will be different if we are posting something related with a
    contest, industry news, or company news. What I think is that we have to take
    into consideration this type to results in order to start our own experiments
    with our brands and see what works for us. For me, it will be difficult to ask
    liking every post, but if it works…. :)  

  • http://www.brickmarketing.com/ Nick Stamoulis

    It makes sense that call to action posts receive the most response.  You don’t want to post them all the time, though.  It could annoy your audience after awhile.  It’s best to blend the types of messages that you send in social media and mix it up so that your followers don’t get sick of you.  

  • Ruthflanagan

    What is the benefit of getting them to just ‘like’ something?  we would like more involvement than that!

  • http://twitter.com/invpartnership Louise Woodbury

    Just like in any face-to-face conversation, we crave interaction and response. This is a great reminder for us to not be ‘bot’ minded but relationally oriented. We do not post in a vacuum. 

  • http://www.belkismarketing.com Belkis Cardona-Rivera

    I like how Jeff says, “use a better word in the call to action.” You don’t necessarily have to be obnoxious or annoying if you ask subtly. 

  • http://twitter.com/SantiagoPombo Santiago Pombo

    While interesting, this sounds like a short-run strategy. I wonder if you constantly ask your users to like your content, no matter how subtly, how effective that will be in the long term.   Worst yet, what if everyone starts doing the same, will it still be effective?…smells like a prisoners dilemma to me. 

  • http://twitter.com/PDarigan Paul Darigan

    Amazed that only 1.3% of updates had a call to action – To me, that would suggest an awful lot of ‘broadcast’-type posts with little effort made to actually engage (and engage with) people.

    I’ve noticed some people suggesting that the ‘ask’ (the request to like/comment) is unsustainable in the long term. I’d agree that constantly asking people to ‘like’ posts is a bit obnoxious / unsustainable, but asking for comments can actually be a really good way to engage people, for example:

    * Post a case-study type update, and ask people what their experience has been
    * Post a photo from an event and invite people to add their photos from that event
    * Ask your community for advice in your posts (either advice for your org, or even better, advice for a member of your community that has requested it)

    If you do get some great comments on posts, don’t forget to ‘like’ them back and/or post your thanks for the comments.

    Thanks for the post Jeff, some really interesting numbers in there (still scratching my head over the 1.3% rate of posts containing CTAs – That really surprised me)

  • http://twitter.com/PDarigan Paul Darigan

    Amazed that only 1.3% of updates had a call to action – To me, that would suggest an awful lot of ‘broadcast’-type posts with little effort made to actually engage with people.

    I’ve noticed some people suggesting that the ‘ask’ (the request to like/comment) is unsustainable in the long term. I’d agree that constantly asking people to ‘like’ posts is a bit obnoxious / unsustainable, but asking for comments can actually be a really good way to engage people, for example:

    * Post a case-study type update, and ask people what their experience has been
    * Post a photo from an event and invite people to add their photos from that event
    * Ask your community for advice in your posts (either advice for your org, or even better, advice for a member of your community that has requested it)

    If you do get some great comments on posts, don’t forget to ‘like’ them back and/or post your thanks for the comments.

    Thanks for the post Jeff, some really interesting numbers in there (still scratching my head over the (realy low)1.3% rate of posts containing CTAs – That really surprised me)

  • http://twitter.com/PDarigan Paul Darigan

    Amazed that only 1.3% of updates had a call to action – To me, that would suggest an awful lot of ‘broadcast’-type posts with little effort made to actually engage with people.

    I’ve noticed some people suggesting that the ‘ask’ (the request to like/comment) is unsustainable in the long term. I’d agree that constantly asking people to ‘like’ posts is a bit obnoxious / unsustainable, but asking for comments can actually be a really good way to engage people, for example:

    * Post a case-study type update, and ask people what their experience has been
    * Post a photo from an event and invite people to add their photos from that event
    * Ask your community for advice in your posts (either advice for your org, or even better, advice for a member of your community that has requested it)

    If you do get some great comments on posts, don’t forget to ‘like’ them back and/or post your thanks for the comments.

    Thanks for the post Jeff, some really interesting numbers in there (still scratching my head over the (realy low)1.3% rate of posts containing CTAs – That really surprised me)

    • http://twitter.com/PDarigan Paul Darigan

      Apologies or the triple-post. I had an error message and thought the comments hadn’t posted

      • http://jeffbullas.com Jeff Bullas

        No problem :)