Is Social Media a Serious Threat to Your Privacy? – Infographic

Privacy is something we all value, but some value it more than others.

Is Social Media a Serious Threat to Your Privacy - Infographic

Social media has taken previously private conversations from offline to online.  Facebook and Twitter have lead this charge onto an open and social web that reveals everything for all to see.

Add a little bit of youth, inexperience and lack of self control and you have a feast of public communication in all its multimedia glory, that sometimes makes you feel like a peeping tom.

To others it’s a voyeur’s paradise that compels and draws you back to view and read whether you like it or not.

The devices, technology and communication is changing rapidly but we as humans change slowly and adapting to this social network ecosystem is exposing our crawling adaptation to this new communication paradigm.

Trust, Control and Privacy on a Social Web

Research shows that nearly two thirds of us don’t trust online companies like Facebook. Facebook has constantly tweaked its complex security settings over the years and despite protests and public outcry it seems that the situation has not improved. Studies show that 68% of Facebook users do not understand the social network’s privacy settings.

According to a 2011 report by MSNBC and the Ponemon Institute internet users feel they have less control over their personal information today than they did 5 years ago.

Social Media Privacy
by MDG Advertising

What about You?

Do you want more control over your privacy on Facebook? Is it too complex?

Have you come to accept that what you share online is public and then communicate appropriately?

Look forward to hearing your views on privacy on a social web that is challenging our perceptions of how and what we share.

More Reading

Image by alancleaver_2000


  • Philip J. Cortes

    This is absolutely spot on Jeff – Privacy Does Matter.

    Other statistic you might like:  91% of employers check your social media profiles before making a hiring decision.  

    We thought that statistic alone was scary enough to build this:

    We show you which parts of your Facebook profile are visible by total strangers and potential employers. 


    • Jeff Bullas

      Thanks for your comment and link. I am sure a lot of my readers will want to check out their profiles privacy !

    • Jeff Bullas

      Thanks for your comment and link. I am sure a lot of my readers will want to check out their profiles privacy !

  • Pkent

    Like you said, many social media users are unaware of what information they may be giving up, and as the issue of privacy is being brought up more frequently, it will become a bigger problem for social media companies to gain the trust of their users.

  • Pauline

    Great points that you have made Jeff, I think we should have more control over our Privacy on Social Media sites, it is so easy today for dishonest people to get our information!


  • Jeff Bullas

    Thanks for the comment Ken. There is one principle I apply to social media. Treat all you say online as public and post and update accordingly. In other words think carefully before publishing!

  • Jeri Usbay

    Facebook functionality has grown, and so has its privacy and
    security settings.  Unfortunately the
    average Facebook user does not take the time to review and update their privacy
    and account settings on Facebook.   And
    since Facebook’s mission is to make the world more open and connected, default
    settings may not match an individual’s sharing comfort level.  Even worse are the permissions that apps on
    Facebook have to access your Facebook data, including the ability to post to
    Facebook as you.  Some of these permissions
    can be removed, but few people know how to edit their app permissions.   It is
    concerning that people blissfully use social media without taking control of
    what privacy and security can be controlled. 
    Social media sites need to take responsibility and be proactive in
    educating their users.   For example, when
    you create your Facebook account, Facebook should require you to update your
    privacy and account settings prior to adding friends and personal information.   How about a pop-up every quarter that steps
    you through your settings or reviews privacy and/or security information?



  • Karl Jacksha

    Great tips especially the way Facebook constantly changes every month or so it’s hard to keep up with.
    The best way to prevent your information from getting into the wrong hands would be to
    submit as little as possible. And only what you want to share.
    And most of all we should have more control over our information sharing that a site like Facebook
     that changes to much to keep up with.

  • Ozio Media

    Social media is still in its infancy as a networking tool. Users are still coming to terms with how to use it and what should and should not be posted to these sites. Of course, younger people will not have the experience in life to know what these boundaries should be. As users become more familiar with the media, the problems revolving around privacy will sort themselves out. As we become more savvy with our use of social media sites, most of us will become less inclined to share things that we would otherwise have kept private.